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command will likely look like when the u.s. transitions to what will be essentially a nato, plus arab countries. h isep model used in afghanistan as it's described to me. we understand the u.s. and france have come to a late agree in the the last few hours there is now no discrepancy between what france wants and what the u.s. wants. the president we understand is culting short his visit to latin america. he plans to transition. i'm told we can expect a transition of command by this time next week. the headquarters likely to be at a nato headquarters in naples, italy. the f-15 fighter jet went down at 11:33 monday evening local time according to u.s. marine officials. the two airmen ejected safely after an apparent malfunction of the jet. other pilots in the air at the time say they did not see enemy fire. seven u.s. military aircraft were launched from their bases in the mediterranean to take part in the recovery. two u.s. carrier jets flew cover for the mission and defense officials confirmed dropped two bomb to separate the pilot from suspected enemy approach. the downed pilot was
of the u.s. military? we'll get an update from the region and talk with two of the senate's most influencial voices on foreign policy, john mccain and joe lieberman. and healthcare reform one year later. we will ask our sunday group what is the long-term prognosis for the president's signature legislation. all, right now on "fox news sunday." and hello again from fox news in washington. before we talk with our guests, we want to bring you the latest on events in the middle east. in syria, government soldiers have been deployed around the cities that have seen the biggest protests. in yemen, talks for a peaceful transfer of power failed saturday. now, authorities worry about al-qaeda gaining strength in that country. and in libya, bombing by u.s. and allied planes has paveed the way for rebel forces to retake the key oil town. for more on libya let's bring in fox news correspondent steve harrigan in tripoli. >> a rapid advance for the rebels. moving quickly toward what they say is an eventual battle here in tripoli. they have taken the key town of ajdabiya. the air strikes have ta
of people in london. dozens of u.s. allies that at least one libyan opposition leader. she discussed the coalition's goals for ending the not war. >> to urge qaddafi to implement a real cease-fire that is not going to be immediately breached by his own forces. to withdraw from those areas that he has taken by force. and to look for a political resolution which could include his leaving the country. >> shepard: this comes as a senior u.s. officials tells fox news that qaddafi's inner circle shows signs of, quote, cracking with some of his most trusted advisors questioning whether he can survive. that official also tells us that morale among the libyan troops is low. but the situation on the ground in the not war does not reflect that over the past 24 hours, colonel qaddafi's forces have made significant gains against the rebel fighters. those rebels advanced quickly over the last couple days qaddafi's hometown of sirte. rockets forced them to double back today, retreat. this despite the coalition firing 22 tomahawk missiles at a cost of $33 million. and flying more than 100 air strike
. phoenix, arizona on our line for republicans. what should the president say on the u.s. involvement in libya on monday? caller: if he's the intelligent president i want him to tell us why we're going into libya and not the sudan and not bahrain. i think it's un:tionable to open another front when we're spending millions a day on iraq and afghanistan and 50% of our revenue goes to defense. host: the sudan would be another front, too. caller: we could help solve that with humanitarian aid. with the cost in fossil fuels, if we paid the actual cost that fossil fuels cost us, we would pay $12.50 a gallon for gasoline because these wars are about oil. what i'm saying is if he's the innocent president then why doesn't he talk about -- intelligent president why doesn't he talk about the bahrain or sudan? he's doing it for oil just like the last -- just like the iraq war. and i think we need to question why we're doing these things. if we want to help people resisting and trying for democracy, let's do that. but let's not be hidden about our agenda.
, by any method. >> now, in a u.s. military briefing just a couple of hours ago, we were told there was no indication gadhafi's forces are moving away from either misrata or ajdabiya. cnn's nic robertson is in the capital city of tripoli. nic, tell me what you have been seeing there if the last 24 hours and also how gadhafi's defiance, if at all, has changed some of the forces within the capital city. >> reporter: well, one of the things we've seen really that reflects the fact that this no-fly zone seems to be fully in place is overnight last night, just before dawn this morning, we heard what sounded like jet aircraft flying overhead and then several loud explosions. so it does give the impression that the coalition can fly and can target locations in and around the city. effectively, it would seem like almost with impunity right now. ajdabiya is a red line for gadhafi. as government officials, they want to hold on to the city. it does appear they're not moving their forces out. the same with misrata. the impression is although a couple of coalition strikes overnight diminis
, whether the u.s. should help the rebels by providing them with weapons. emily schmidt has the latest. good morning, emily. >> reporter: good morning to you. president obama says he is looking at all options to support the rebels. but when members of the international diplomatic community met in london and had a chance to talk about it, one member said the talk of arming rebels didn't come up. with nato set to take command of military operation, president obama says moammar gadhafi is feeling the pressure. >> the circle around gadhafi understands that the noose is tightening. their days are probably numbered. >> reporter: diplomats from more than three dozen countries met in london yesterday, to discuss libya in a potential post-gadhafi era. >> we must help people plan for their future after the conflict is over. >> reporter: but forces loyal to gadhafi are pushing back rebels from ground they just gained. diplomats say they did not discuss arming the rebels. though, the idea is up for debate. >> there could be a legitimate transfer of arms if i country would choose to do that. >> we are th
belong to al-qaeda. >>> and u.s. supreme court justice skeela has been ticketed for causing an accident along the george washington parkway. the 75-year-old was on his way to the high court when he rear ended the car in front of him setting off a chain reaction. >>> mayor stephanie rawlings- blake will unveil her budgets today. in it, there's 8% less spending for the year of 2012. some of the cuts include reduced funding for the 311 center. the document doesn't include tax increases. >>> there's a surprise for cavaliers fans. opening lineups are announced for the heat. lebron james doesn't appear. >> lebron james. [crowd booing] >> lebron james was in the bathroom. the calvs got the last laugh. the heat lost. 102-90. >>> the orioles finished up spring chaining and broke records doing so. more than 115,000 fans finished up at a renovated smith stadium. ed smith stadium hosted ten sellouts. a average attendance was 70,200,019. that's a lot. >>> and the oriole's home opener is this monday. our special pregame coverage starts at 2:00 and stick around for the game itself. a full day of oriol
american fighters jets are active at the moment, u.s. pilots flew 113 of the 175 coalition air sorties yesterday, for example, that u.s. role will shrink dramatically in the next few days leaving others to decide on military targeting. on the ground all public signals from the regime suggest continued defiance and continued attacks on the opposition. but here's the intriguing nugget. senior u.s. officials tell cnn tonight that some members of gadhafi's inner circle are reaching out to the state department and reaching out to other arab nations, as well. curious contacts to say the least but as yet our sources tell us no indication gadhafi himself is looking to negotiate an exit strategy. >> i think there are any number of possible outcomes here, and no one is in a position to predict them. whether they're -- whether there are major further defections or divisions within his family, there are a variety of possibilities that seems to me. >> a variety of possibilities but listen here, secretary gates isn't betting on a peaceful settlement. >> gadhafi has basically sworn that he will show
in the u.s. >>> a killer whale that drowned its trainer, one year ago, today, he is back in the show at sea world. some are asking if it's too soon, or even safe at all. it's all new, all live. it's "happening now". jon: good morning to you! i'm jon scott. jenna: hi everybody, i'm jenna lee. nice to have you back, jon. >>> "happening now", major setbacks in the rebels in libya, proqaddafi forces forcing them to retreat from a key oil town. it's a big story, jon. jon: it's a rapid reversal coming days after the opposition made gains west and trying to take over qaddafi's home town. nato war planes flying over the zones with the heaviest fighting, witnesses reporting hearing explosions indicating a new round of air strikes. jenna: all the chaos is affecting the oil industry. that is the industry in libya. we have word today that only one refinery is still functioning. there are now fears of a fuel shortage in libya. how that fight affect the fight. and also what that means for the rest of the world so dependent on oil now. rick leventhal is traveling to benghazi now, he's going to call us in
, and these are u.s. company that is have their core base here. the good news is i think if we meet the object i haves -- objectives that we've talked about, we will stimulate clean technologies, software, hardware, all of the real disruptive technologies that we are talking about. they are global, their competitors are global, they have to be global. i think if we do the right thing, we are going to do well by exports. which is real positive. >> this is a really important point. we tend to maybe think of these things in silos. but one the president's key initiatives is doubling exports over the next five years. and, of course, that involves, you know, large companies, boeing and others. when you look at the numbers, the real way we're going to do is in increasing in the small and medium-sized enterprises. turns out that 30% of the exports are from small and medium-sized enterprises. and that's disproportionally small. and there's only 250,000 small companies that export. so if you look at the math, there's almost three million small businesses $30 million smalls. xiii of them who have traded go
to take control of the sky over libya. possibly changing the role for u.s. troops in that region, and president obama is preparing his remarks on the situation there. >>> and running for cover in the middle east. protesters in syria met with a hail of gunfire. is that the next domino to fall? from the cnn center in atlanta, georgia, this is your cnn "saturday morning." thank you for spending part of your weekend with us. we do want to start in japan right now where there is growing concerns over radiation levels in the ocean near that damaged nuclear plant, but there is some positive news as well from the fukushima plant. radiation levels in the air seem to be decreasing. cnn's paula hancocks live in tokyo. paula, hello. sounds like good news/bad news. let's start with the bad news. >> reporter: that's right, t.j. well, this is the water in the sea just off the coast of the fukushima nuclear plant. according to japan's nuclear safety agency, the levels of radioactive iodine are more than 1,200 levels than they should be. a cause for alarm. we're hearing from the agency it's only
the situation in libya as "unique" and said the u.s. intervened militarily to prevent a humanitarian crisis. >> it's true that america cannot use our military wherever repression occurs. and given the costs and risks of intervention, we must always measure our interests against the need for action. but that cannot be an argument for never acting on behalf of what's right. of course, there is no question that libya and the world would be better off with gadhafi out of power. i along with many other world leaders have embraced that goal. and will actively pursue it through non-military means. but broadening our military mission to include regime change would be a mistake. >> and to further that point on regime change, the president said "weapon went down that road in iraq." he also said that history is not on gadhafi's side. he says nato will assume full control of the libyan mission wednesday, and the u.s. will play a supporting role, reducing the risk and the cost of the operation. >>> the president's speech was not enough to satisfy some critics on capitol hill. house speaker john boehner
from under a three-star general and it means that the u.s. will effectively now be taking a supportive role rather than the primary role in this operation going forward really just sending in reconnaissance and jamming planes rather than conducting a majority of the strike missions it has been and, of course, the cruise missiles. >> is it clear what would constitute success and when the operation would be over? >> reporter: that's at the moment is not clear, in fact, on the sunday talk shows in the united states, secretary of defense and the secretary of state were asked that kind of thing and could give no collar indication of whether this be a question of weeks, months or whether it would be over by the end of the year so we are hoping for more details as the day progresses but i think it's hard to ascertain how long this campaign might continue, zain. >> cnn diana magnay reporting, thanks, diana. >>> another look at how the rebels advanced. operation held areas are here marked in yellow. areas under control are marked in green. on friday the rebels were in control of benghazi. colon
stated that it is u.s. policy that gadhafi needs to go. we have a wide range of tools in addition to our military efforts to support that policy. >> the american people from the congress need to hear what our president believes his objectives are. if we are going into a war with libya, we should declare a war on libya. we should pull together with our allies and try to figure out a plan of how that war is to be won. these are things that must be debated here in washington apart from paris or at least encounters with other countries in which we say we'll hold your coat. we don't object to what you are up to. >>> good morning. welcome to morning joe. beautiful shot. times square. beautiful because i'm not there. i'm in dallas. mika is in the south of france trying to gather a feeling of the people in that beautiful part of the country. a story breaking suggesting that america, the united kingdom upset with the french leadership for overreaching. we are going to talk to mike barnicle about that. visiting professor, harlds ford junior and the great willie geist. pat buchanan and the host of
, david applegate of the u.s. geological survey will discuss the threat of earthquakes and other july 6 -- your logic hazards. [captioning performed by national captioning institute] [captions copyright national cable satellite corp. 2011] host: good morning, friday, march 18. we will open up the phone lines for your comments today on the story that is most important to you. we will put the phone numbers on the screen right away. unfolding news about the u.n. security council and possible air strikes against libya, and continuing crises in japan and the budget story at home. the most significant new was story. we will go to your phone calls right away to hear what is most important to you in a week of unfolding big issues. we will go to the newspapers as we are waiting for your calls. as you can see, britain, france, and the united states are lined up for air strike against coffee -- gaddafi. it suggests in the newspapers the airplanes may well immediately. "the chicago tribune" tells us american officials expect the united states would do the heavy lifting in a campaign that may includ
. and in about 45 minutes, former u.s. comp then, political strategist maria cardona and john feehery and we will discuss the arab world with a former u.s. ambassador to morocco, marc ginsburg. on this channel, "washington journal" is next, live with your phone calls. later today, we will give you a brown paper -- roundtable that will include the mayor of boston, st. paul, the minnesota, green though, mississippi, and sacramento, california. [captioning performed by national captioning institute] host: the video on your screen is some of the latest footage on the air raids in libya, courtesy of the aljazeera network. with the president act in town, questions are being raised about u.s. policy and goals in libya. that is our discussion this morning on the "washington journal" as we go through the newspapers. what do you think? how is the president handling the libya conflict so far? 202 is the area code -- how do you think the president is handling the libyan conflict. yesterday speaker john boehner sent this letter to the president. speaker boehner list several questions he asks the question
obama says the u.s. is actually ratcheting down involvement in libya but, still, no plans for dealing with muammar qaddafi. >> wake up. air traffic controller falls asleep on the job. if you have not heard putting lives at risk but instead of fixing that problem the f.a.a. changes the rules and another bureaucratic coverup? we report. you decide. >>clayton: and an idea to cut the deficit. tax how far you drive. a government official thinks that should be used against you. like a little old lady would not be taxed as much as briggs. could a mileage tax be on the way? muammar qaddafi -- >>dave: i am a train guy! >> it's "fox and friends" right now. >>dave: everyone, good saturday morning, heather is here this morning with us. >> great to have you. >> >>clayton: we need a vat of coffee for heather. >>dave: this is the one person on the planet and this is late for her because she usually anchors at 4:30 in the morning, so this is sleeping in. sleeping in. >>clayton: and now, the news we are following overnight because if violence continuing to rip through the muslim world, and a number of
the wheel. assistant u.s. attorney john siroka asked the judge to impose a 20-year sentence for the, quote, disregard that jones showed, especially after prior traffic and substance convicts. the defense asked for mercy. jones addressed the court, turning his head slightly toward the spectators and saying to the family, i am truly sorry and then turning back toward the judge and adding i hope one day they find it in theirer hearts to for-- their hearts to forgive me. the superior judge wasup moved grimly pointing out the defendant was arrested 13 times the last 10 years, convicted five times and was forbidden to drive. the sentence, 20 years. >> the real enemy in my men -- opinion is not mr. jones but the easy access to drugs, and i think unless and until we can do something to stem the tide, we will have unfortunate tragedies like this again. >> reporter: the physical injuries to all four children have mostly healed but they're still traumatized about the death of their mother. >> >>> a heartbreaking accident in laurel. the prince georges county police report a mother was dropping her two
traffic control procedures. u.s. transportation secretary ray lahood calling for at least two air traffic controllers now to man overnight shifts. this after a controller at d.c.'s reagan national airport reportedly fell asleep and two planes couldn't get in touch with the tower after mid night just trying to land. both had to go in for a landing on their own. toes your headlines. >> five hour energy ran out and two planes had to do their own thing. >> i'm sure nothing's down there on the runway. let's cross our fingers. let's talk a little bit about what's going on right now. in libya, new video just in, one of qaddafi's bases reportedly destroyed by u.s. coalition air strikes. look at these pictures, showing a flaming wreckage overnight and qaddafi's compound in tripoli also reportedly targeted again and was struck. the commander of britain's royal air force says libya's air force no longer exists. >> so now that we also have an exclusive story that came to us, i think james rosen and jennifer griffin working on this together. essentially, there might be some break as we try to find o
upper level winds that actually transport that into parts of kansas, the u.s., and many other places. and before all is said and done, i would not be surprised if you could find trace amounts of this all the way over to europe. but i have to tell you, this is very, very harmless. this is not a big deal. if you're walking out to your car in bright sunlight, chances are you might be exposed to more radiation than that than these particles across the globe. >> it does still, of course, make you think twice when you hear about it. but hearing it's harmless is good. >>> in a few minutes, we'll be talking more about all of this with a disaster expert about containment efforts in japan. he led numerous expeditions into some of the most contaminated areas of chernobyl. >>> to libya now, and rebels getting closer to moammar gadhafi's doorstep gaining ground with new coalition air strikes. nato now says it will take over the entire military mission there, not just the no-fly zone. so far the u.s. has supplied nearly all the fire power according to pentagon figures. the u.s. military has launch
outside the reactor. so high that top u.s. environmental officials report that a single dose is enough to cause hemorrhaging. more from osaka, japan. >> reporter: yes, megyn. it is looking serious now in terms of the quantity of radiation emanating from the nuclear plant. it appears that we have significant problems at reactor 2 and reactor 3. hearing there are pools of water in a trench that drains off from the reactor towards the sea. it's about 90 feet from the sea, we believe. and that's perhaps one of the reasons that we're seeing greater contamination off the shore. the information is not entirely cleaand that is because they're not sure exactly where the leak is coming from. the greatest concern is that it's coming from the container vessel, indicating, indeed, that there is a partial meltdown. the meltdown may be temporary, that hopefully they will be able to fill that container area up and keep the rods cool. because the radiation levels are so high, it's difficult for the workers to get in there. if they're able to go in without getting radiation burns, it limits what they ca
now entered it's second week. why the u.s. is now trying to take a back seat in the operation. >>> one maryland county is trying to put more room between protesters and funerals, how they plan to do it. >>> the fbi says she stuffed nearly $80,000 in cash into her underwear, i'm kelly mcpherson, coming up on eyewitness news, we'll detail additional charges for ,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,, >>> welcome back to eyewitness news saturday morning. i'm gigi barnett. >>> i'm tim williams. it is around 30 degrees at bwi, marshal in baltimore a degree or so warmer. it will not be a very warm day overall. the sky is brightening. we have clouds but the sun is peaking through the horizon. we have a good bit of cloud cover right now. that is ahead of a storm system that is moving in. it will be passing on our south side over the next 12 hours or so. we will start to see the potential for snow showers that we'll talk about in a moment. for today 46 degrees, chilly with times of clouds and sun. 30 degrees, mostly cloudy with a little snow late. we're talking after midnight. your day's events today we'll be oka
and there are clear signs of headway on two fronts. no more need for cruise missiles since in the words of one u.s. official we now have air dominance. coalition forces can fly to their targets in jets having little to fear from the bombed out defenses of the regime. if you're counting, the allies fired 162 tomahawk missiles since saturday. the vast majority american. if carried out 175 sorties since yesterday. behind the scenes we may be nearing a breakthrough in the back and forth over command and control. the u.s. and britain won a leading role for nato. france and arab nations don't. now it seems nato will coordinate the troops and hardware while political leaders call the shots. they're due to meet tuesday in london. >>> moammar gadhafi is vaui is o fight on. i want to bring in cnn national security analyst peter bergen to talk about this. good to have you with us. let's start by talking about the opposition. we heard so much about the rebels on the ground in libya. what do you know about them and do you know if they can be trusted? >> well, let's start with the fact that the u.s. government
in libya. how big of a role will the u.s. play now? are we still in charge? and with war fatigue setting in and criticism from both sides of the aisle, when does the president fully explain what's perhaps, monday or tuesday of next week. >>> plus, fear of spreading terrorism. there were anti-government demonstrations today and in some cases violence in many arab countries, including yemen. thousands turned out calling for the ouster of a u.s. ally. if the president is overthrown, who stops al qaeda in the arabian peninsula from taking over? >>> and there are increasing concerns of spreading radiation from the crippled power plant in japan with even more people now being encouraged to get out of the area, but not ordered. how great is that danger? >>> plus, a little politics with hispanics now making up one of our every six americans and one out of every four children, by the way, how long can republicans be seen as hostile to their interests? the huge implications of the census report on the 2012 presidential election. and finally, what's the more serious candidates to do? how does anyon
was simply that i did not believe that the president had outlined a vital u.s. american interest in our engagement in libya, that the united states cannot afford to be the police force of the wor world. this week, with the president's address to the nation, i had hoped that i would hear something to change my mind, or, better yet, something that would instill confidence about the president's decision, but unfortunately, this address provided the american people with many more questions than answers. president obama left me wondering why any vital u.s. american interest in libya would justify military action. he said refugees would stream into tunisia and egypt, but we often aid refugees without f-15's. he said we needed to preserve the writ of the united nations security council, but he did not explain why the safety of our men and women in uniform should ever be put at the service of that body. he said that we needed to show dictators across the region that they could not use violence to cling to power. but if president obama's policy fails to get rid of qaddafi, that iqaddafi,that --
the united states is helping bring in crucial fresh water. >> the u.s. navy has spent two owe has sent two naval barges loaded with 525,000 gallons of fresh water. meanwhile the air force has sent 500 tons of battled water aboard six c-130s to sendai for people desperate to get their hands on uncontaminated water. they are based 20 miles west of tokyo, home to 3,600 service men who feel just as much wrapped up in this disaster as japan's citizens. >> our hearts here go out to them. we grieve with those that have lost everything. >> at the fukushima plant, levels of radioactive iodine in the seawater are at 1,250 levels higher than safety limits, according to officials. but they do say by the time that enters the food chain it will have diluted and be safe for humans to heat. but how reliable that information is remains to be seen. the government says the utility managing fukushima isn't being honest with the authorities. the country's prime minister said the situation was very unpredictable and he wasn't optimistic about a quick solution to the end of the crisis. >> and that was fox's domi
. violence rips law the middle east and the arab world. and now the u.s. is handed over control of the no-fly zone to nato but the u.s. military is still deeply involved. so what is going on? a live report moments away. and a muslim teacher asks for three weeks off to go on a pilgrimage and the school says "no way," she did not work there long enough and the department of justice is suing the school. what is up with that? >> states want to tax big corporations to fix their deficit instead of changing policy so now one big company, caterpillar, employs thousands of people, is ready to flee illinois. could this happen in your state? we continue right now with "fox and friends" this morning. >> welcome, everyone. you are watching "fox and friends" today. >> welcome to "fox and friends" on saturday morning. thank you for waking up with us. that is dave briggs and heather is here and i am clayton. >> lots going on today. >>dave: we start with new developments in libya where rebels have retaken the key town of ajdabiya after a fierce battle with muammar qaddafi forces and rick is live inside th
targeted a libyan airfield sunday and other u.s., british and french planes attacked moammar gadhafi's ground troops near the opposition strong hold of benghazi. >> we now have the capability to patrol the airspace over lybia and we are doing just that into a more consistent air presence. the no fly zone is effectively in place. >> reporter: rebels in benghazi welcome the international military actions against gadhafi forces. some of them danced on destroyed tanks. the u.s. and other coalition countries launched the military operation yesterday after the united nations authorized all necessary measures to protect civilians in the northern african country. >> we have seen the people of lybia take a courageous stand against a regime determined to brutalize its own citizens. >> reporter: u.s. officials say there have been no reports of civilian casualties, but today the head of the arab league criticized the international mission saying the strikes have gone beyond what the league had supported. >> translator: what happened differs from the no fly zone objectives. what we want is protec
>>> good morning. presidential pressure. as moammar gadhafi continues to thumb his nose at the u.s. and its allies, striking back at libyan rebels, president obama tells cbs news it is time for gadhafi to give up the fight. >> we've got to ratchet up our diplomatic and our political pressure on him so that at some point he makes a decision to leave. >> we'll hear more from our interview with the president, and speak with former defense secretary donald rumsfeld about the u.s. mission in libya. >>> plane scary. officials discover a bullet hole in a us airways passenger jet after a flight from philadelphia to charlotte. now an investigation is under way to try to figure out just where it came from, and how serious a threat it posed to the aircraft and its passengers. >>> and fighting back. a middle school student from connecticut goes on youtube with an emotional plea for help after being bullied by her classmates for years. that video is now burning up the internet, adding to the national debate, causing quite a stir, "early" this wednesday morning, debate, causing quite a stir, "ea
said in a potential intervention would come with regret. u.s. and allied forces meeting in paris to talk about potential military action. president obama said yesterday that the united states will take part in a no-flight effort. -- no-fly effort. we want to get your thoughts on the u.s. joined the no-fly effort. here is how you can contribute this morning. here iare the numbers at the bottom of your screen. the president announcing yesterday in a statement about the united states supporting a no-fly zone. this has been done by several allies. we will take a look at the headlines on "washington journal" this morning. mr. obama sketched out an american military role. -- rule. you have probably seen other headlines this morning as well. meetings are going on to talk about the strategy with the united states and other allied forces. the president made the statement yesterday about joining the no- fly zone effort. he spoke about what the united states will not do. here is what he had to say. >> i want to be clear about what we will not be doing. the united states is not going to depl
gadhafi's hometown. president obama prepares to explain his decision to involve the u.s. military in libya during an address to the nation tonight. >>> in a disturbing case, the 55 billionaire air to the s.c. johnson fortune charged with sexually abusing a child for years. the alleged victim, his now 15-year-old stepdaughter. >>> and princely party. harry threw his brother a bachelor party over the weekend but a hitch in the plans forced a last-minute change. we'll have details and tell you about our plans for the royal we'll have details and tell you about our plans for the royal wedding today, march 28, 2011. captions paid for by nbc-universal television >>> good morning. welcome to "today" on a monday morning. i'm matt lauer. >> i'm meredith vieira. nice to be back. >> it's been a while. >> it has. i went to london to vicsit the queen. she wouldn't answer the door though. but president obama is going to face criticism. membe members of both parties have expressed concerns about the goal of the mission and how long our forces will be in libya. we'll have more straight ahead. >> also, did
in on our own. we should be going in under the u.n., not the u.s. flag. we shouldn't attack a country this didn't attack us first and shouldn't have boots on the ground. from that mouth, this is sort of the perfect way to go. we go in not under the u.s. flag but under the u.n. flag. we go in on the humanitarian mission, short-term limited thing, no boots on the ground. i think that going in, he did it the right way. my big question is how long are we going to be there? what really is our mission? i think the -- it is really, really fuzzy whether it is just to protect the rebels or to get gadhafi out. we are saying both things. how much is it going to cost? it depends on how soon we get out. if we could turn this over to the french government or to somebody else, as they say they are going to, in a couple of days, get out of there, then i think this is going to be a successful operation. if it drags on and gadhafi stays in power, it is another loser. >> pat buchanan, what are the odds if we are being realistic we will be out as the president had said in a mere matter of days, turning i
is this supposed to work? >> well, good morning, betty. the u.s. makes no quick exit from libya, as it had hoped. nato does take over the no-fly zone, but the u.s. remains firmly in charge of the brunt of the combat there. american warplanes will continue to fly strike missions over libya, for now. >> this operation has already saved many lives. but the danger is far from over. >> reporter: thursday, nato agreed to take over partial command from the u.s. the 28-nation alliance could begin enforcing the no-fly zone as early as this weekend. but american forces would still be involved in everything from surveillance to bombing specific targets. >> we will continue to apply the pressure we can to compel them to stop killing their own people. >> reporter: coalition jets pounded the country for a sixth straight day thursday, hitting a military base, and a libyan plane that violated the no-fly zone. still, government forces continued their assault on rebels in the western city of misrata. hospitals there were inundated with victims. while natos aagreed to only a partial takeover, that could soon chang
the country on u.s. action with libya with critics on both sides of the aisle hammering about the plan. what does he need to say? a former presidential speech write are is here next. >> dave: getting bang for their buck. radio shack, make ago unusual offer. buy satellite tv, get a gun. good idea? we report you decide. >> clayton: sometimes you want to shoot your tv. your cable. introducing the thunderbolt by htc. immense power. scorching speed. the first phone strong enough to run on the fastest, most advanced 4g network in america. the two trains and a bus rider. the "i'll sleep when it's done" academic. for 80 years, we've been inspireby you. and we've been honored to walk with you to help you get where u want to be. ♪ because your moment is now. let nothing stand in your way. ♪ [ giggles ] let nohey, max.nd in your way. [ announcer ] you can help significantly extend your dog's healthy years. a groundbreaking 14-year study by purina... proves that puppy chow, then dog chow nutrition, fed properly over a lifetime, can help extend his lovable antics up to 1.8 healthy years. long live yo
>>> good morning. a responsibility to act. president obama defends his decision to involvele the u.s. military in libya but vowed our troops will not be used to overthrow moammar gadhafi by force. >> to be blunt, we went down that road in iraq. >> did the president say enough to quiet his critics? >> prince harry joins a punishing expedition to the north pole. we are with him live. >> and buried. a snow boarder crashes and becomes trapped upside down in six feet of snow. his helmet camera captured it all including a desperate call to his wife. >> i'm stuck in a tree well. give them my phone number. >> are you serious? >> i'm going to die if they don't find me. >> luckily, she did and he was finally rescued. he's sharing his story with us finally rescued. he's sharing his story with us today, tuesday, march 29, 2011. captions paid for by nbc-universal television >>> welcome to "today" on this tuesday morning. i'm meredith vieira. >> i'm matt lauer. president obama vowed america's role would be limited in libya last night. he told the nation we had fulfilled the pledge, we had done wha
. the u.s. counts on him to keep pressure on al qaeda in yemen and is reportedly trying to broker a deal. by phone, a newspaper editor said the president and the nation are running out of time. >> i don't think it will take more than a week. i believe he'll step down less than a week if he is asked or we could see a civil war after it the week. >> reporter: and now supporters and -- nentss opponents. the violence happening as secretary gates was here. reforms clearly not happening fast enough for the thousands in the streets across the region. we expect to see more protests here in jordan and in syria after funerals to bury the dead. and in yemen, those talks continue, but at this point, everything seems to be at a very intense stalemate. >> ron allen, thanks. and for more we're joined by mark halperin. good morning. civilians are being targeted in many places. yet it's only libya where the world seems to be reapgting with the no-fly zone and no drive zone. let me start off by playing what president obama said on that very question this morning in his weekly radio address. >> the united
contacts or other u.s. officials' contacts with the opposition since the -- that first meeting in paris between the secretary and mr. jabril. and tell us if you are at all closer to making a decision on whether to follow the lead that france so helpfully started out a couple weeks and recognizing them a legitimate government. >> since the start of the crisis, when we saw that the council had constituted itself as some kind of temporary governing body, i and certainly members of my staff recognized that some of those people were people that we had dealt with during our tenures in libya. and so right from the start, i had been reaching out to the leaders of the council. and since that time, since the embassy was reconstituted here as i said, we had extensive dealings and contacts through our various programs, especially educational programs, with the people of the east. i had a very active public affairs section in libya, and they were always communicating with the -- with the doctors and jurists and people who, in fact, now are part of the council. so we had a good in to those people. si
are routine, about once a month, and that realistically, killing a u.s. agent along the border is bad for business. it makes it more difficult to get your load across and make money because you get more agents, money, resources. having said that, this is the reality that these guys are dealing with. megyn? megyn: thank you, william. this report is one day after the homeland security department announced a $5 million reward in the shooting of jaime zapata last month. they were ambushed last month in mexico. zapata and his partner were shot several times. zapata died of his injuries. they were there to help the mexican government with its drug war. some arrests have been made, but the investigation is ongoing. this is another extreme weather alert for you, as we watch the storms moving across florida. mother nature is playing a cruel april fools joke on the snow-weary northeast. look at that pink. powerful storm developing. forecasters warn that it will intensify bringing strong winds and heavy, wet snow along the east coast. they're warning folks to prepare for power outages and major
very much. a week into the campaign the u.s. role in libya is about to change. nato will take over enforcement of the no-fly zone but rebels and pro-gadhafi forces are fighting it out street to street. nbc's richard engel is one of the first journalists to reach ajdabiya where there are battles raging now. good morning. >> reporter: good morning. rebels have taken about half of this city. gadhafi's forces still contain pockets and have tanked positioned around the edges. we have seen street-to-street fighting. we can hear gunfire now. rebels have been taking cover, firing machine guns, trying to find gadhafi's forces and drive them out. this is what the war in libya has become. the western air strikes will take out gadhafi's heavy weapons, tanks, aircraft and allow the rebels to push into cities themselves and fight it out almost hand to hand with gadhafi's forces in several cities in libya. >> you talk hand to hand. i was struck on thursday by your reporting and how poorly equipped the rebels seemed to be in terms of weapons. are you sai seeing indications that they are being supp
back to world war ii. are you ruling out u.s. military hardware assistance? >> i'm not ruling it out but i'm also not ruling it in. we're not taking anything off the table at this point. our primary military goal is to protect civilian populations and set up the no-fly zone. our primary strategic goal is for gadhafi to step down so the libyan people have an opportunity to live a decent life. >> we'll get to some of the other questions around this, including the double standard as it pertains to syria and other countries and whether or not the president should have gone to congress. first let's go around the table. pat, i'll start with you. if we arm the rebels aren't you in a sense going after gadhafi in the biggest way, which is something we were not going to do. >> you're much more openly doing what you're actually doing anyhow. >> exactly. >> you're getting into the war more deeply on the side of the folks who want to ouflt gadhafi. it will be a longer and bloodier war between gadhafi's forces and the rebels, you put all that equipment in there. it will be a real hellish mess. >>
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